Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Hormone Health

The connection between thyroid function and weight gain

By Dr. Sarah Zadek ND The inability to lose weight from diet and exercise alone can be extremely frustrating. There are many factors that affect weight management, and for those who struggle with this it may be worth investigating other causes of this “stubborn metabolism.” One such cause is the functioning of the thyroid gland and its respective hormones. Thyroid hormones play crucial roles in how the body uses energy and regulates appetite. Additionally, fat cells, also called adipose tissue, contains their own messengers and hormones that affect energy stores and usage. The interaction between these cells, their messengers and

Signs and Struggles of PCOS

Information is not intended to diagnose treat or cure any condition. Please see a qualified healthcare practitioner for information and assessment if you suspect you may be suffering from PCOS. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a hormone disorder affecting 5-10% of childbearing women and the most significant cause of infertility amongst women of all nationalities. Its classification as a syndrome means that there is a systemic nature and a constellation of signs and symptoms that result from disordered endocrine function. This means no two individuals with ovaries will experience it the same. Symptoms vary greatly from weight gain, acne, excessive hair growth,

Control PCOS: Control Your Life

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is considered one of the leading endocrine disorders affecting up to 10% of all women of reproductive age.1 It is a complex disorder stemming from inappropriate hypothalamic-pituitary- ovarian interaction (see the article titled “An introduction to the HPG Axis”), thought to be one of the leading causes of infertility. Why and how PCOS develops is not yet understood, although accumulating evidence suggests that it may be mostly genetic.2,3 Diagnosis, Symptoms and Risks A PCOS diagnosis is based on menstrual irregularity, excessive production of androgens (masculinizing hormones) or excessive masculinizing traits (such as balding, excessive body and facial hair),

Xenoestrogens: Hidden Dangers in our Modern World

Xenoestrogens or “foreign estrogens” are chemical compounds that mimic the effects of estrogen in our bodies. Sources come from almost all walks  of our modern lives, from industry, water sources, agriculture, clothing/ textiles, furniture, home cleaning products, make-up, skin care products, contraceptives, sunscreens, insecticides, food dyes, electrical oils, emulsifiers, paints; the list is almost endless. An additional list of common sources of xenoestrogens can be seen in Table 1. While these chemicals have systemic effects in our bodies, there are certain areas that will concentrate xenoestrogens and demonstrate more significant issues due to exposure. These areas include the brain (pituitary,

Is it Really my Thyroid? Hypothyroidism Explored

Hypothyroid  is  also  known  as  low or underactive thyroid. This condition occurs when the gland fails to produce proper amounts of the thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) to meet the body’s needs. Thyroid disease is estimated to affect 200 million people worldwide. Of those affected with thyroid dysfunction the majority are women, of which an estimated 50% remain undiagnosed. There are numerous factors that may contribute to low thyroid function including: Autoimmune disease (known as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis) Hyperthyroid treatment (using radioactive iodine or thyroid suppressing medications) Thyroid surgery Radiation therapy of the head and neck regions Medications such as birth

Phytoestrogens Explained

Menopausal    women    searching for  safe  and   effective   alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) will inevitably come across “phytoestrogens”, either in their whole food form or as a concentrated extract in a supplement. But what exactly are phytoestrogens and how do they work in the human body? Are they even safe? Many answers remain unknown to the general public and the literature can offer mixed results as well. Let’s clear up some of the confusion. The term “phytoestrogen” can literally be translated into “plant estrogen”. In the 1950’s, this estrogenic activity was discovered in plants when researchers  investigated  the  cause   of

Menopause: What Are My Natural Options?

Menopause is a normal, natural and inevitable event that affects all women reaching middle to late adulthood. In a very basic sense, menopause occurs as a result of aging. Changes in the structure and function of the female ovaries  lead to a drastic drop in estrogen  levels and permanent cessation of menses. Unfortunately, its associated symptoms can make this process quite uncomfortable for many women and can negatively impact their social life, psychological health and overall well- being.1 The most common concern in postmenopausal women are hot flashes; these cause an episodic feeling of heat, intense sweating and flushing of

Stress-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction: The Hormone-Neurotransmitter Connection

Several studies have examined the influence of emotions on cognition, but common everyday situations also testify to the prevalence of this phenomenon. Indeed, who has never forgotten something important under the effect of acute stress, or hasn’t witnessed a menopausal relative complaining about becoming forgetful? The mechanisms and neural circuits involved in emotions and cognition are inextricably linked, and the maintenance of this delicate neurochemical balance is easily disrupted from exposure to stress. Stress triggers a cascade of hormone and neurotransmitter release throughout the brain, affecting our thoughts, decision-making process and behavior. Understanding the Impact of Stress Hans Selye (1907-1982),

clickid